PARENTESI

Parentesi

Parentesi

Parentesi

PARENTESI

Pulley lamp

1970 Design: Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzł

1970 Production: Flos

Pulley lamp providing direct light.

The design of the lamp was inspired by a sketch by Pio Manzł (d.1969) in which a cylindrical box with a slit for light slid up and down a pole and was fixed in place with a screw. According to the sketch, Pio Manzł probably would have had the pole run from ceiling to floor.

In his design, Castiglioni replaces the pole with a metal cable which when deviated creates attrition and allows the light to remain in position with no need for a screw.

Parentesi essentially is made of a stainless steel cable, hung from the ceiling and kept in tension by the base on the floor, along which a tubular socket runs up and down. The cable is attached to the ceiling with a steel expansion screw concealed by a cylindrical metal element and is anchored to the floor by a cylindrical counterweight made of black rubber-covered lead, the height from the floor is regulated by a steel boat hook. The lamp’s name “Parentesi” derives from the bracket-shaped steel tube (enamelled or chromed) which supports a rotating rubber joint holding the socket for a 150 watt bulb and the lead.

This tube runs up and down the pole by simple hand pressure and is held in place by the sliding friction created along the pole which prevents it from slipping once it is in position. The two caps on the extremities of the tube have an opening for the cable. This apparatus allows infinite ways of setting the direction and height of the light.

In 1970, Parentesi was presented to the public in a kit created by Castiglioni: it contained all the easily mountable pieces of the lamp. The kit was vacuum packed and consisted of a white base shell that slotted perfectly into the transparent top shell. The handles on the side of the pack made it easy to carry.

Compasso d’Oro: 1979.

Last modified: $ Date: 2009-04-03$